OVERLOCKING SERVICE

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PV1 also has an overlocking service available, if that’s all you need done.

An overlock is a kind of stitch that sews over the edge of one or two pieces of cloth for edging, hemming, or seaming. Usually an overlock sewing machine will cut the edges of the cloth as they are fed through (such machines being called “sergers” in North America), though some are made without cutters. The inclusion of automated cutters allows overlock machines to create finished seams easily and quickly. An overlock sewing machine differs from a lockstitch sewing machine in that it uses loopers fed by multiple thread cones rather than a bobbin. Loopers serve to create thread loops that pass from the needle thread to the edges of the fabric so that the edges of the fabric are contained within the seam.

Overlock sewing machines usually run at high speeds, from 1000 to over 9000 rpm, and most are used in industry for edging, hemming and seaming a variety of fabrics and products. Overlock stitches are extremely versatile, as they can be used for decoration, reinforcement, or construction.

Overlocking is also referred to as “overedging”, “merrowing”, or “serging”. Though “serging” technically refers to overlocking with cutters, in practice the four terms are used interchangeably.

Types of overlock stitches

Overlock stitches are classified in a number of ways. The most basic classification is by the number of threads used in the stitch. Industrial overlock machines are generally made in 1, 2, 3, 4, or 5 thread formations. Each of these formations has unique uses and benefits:

  • 1-thread: End-to-end seaming or “butt-seaming” of piece goods for textile finishing.
  • 2-thread: Edging and seaming, especially on knits and wovens, finishing seam edges, stitching flatlock seams, stitching elastic and lace to lingerie, and hemming. This is the most common type of overlock stitch.
  • 3-thread: Sewing pintucks, creating narrow rolled hems, finishing fabric edges, decorative edging, and seaming knit or woven fabrics.
  • 4-thread: Decorative edging and finishing, seaming high-stress areas, mock safety stitches which create extra strength while retaining flexibility.
  • 5-thread: In apparel manufacturing, safety stitches utilizing two needles create a very strong seam.

Two- and three-thread formations are also known as merrowing after the Merrow Machine Company.

Additional variables in the types of overlock stitches are the stitch eccentric, and the stitch width. The stitch eccentric indicates how many stitches per inch there are, which is adjustable and can vary widely within one machine. Different stitch eccentrics create more or less dense and solid-looking edges. The stitch width indicates how wide the stitch is from the edge of the fabric. Lightweight fabrics often require a wider stitch to prevent pulling.

Adding extra variation in stitch types is the differential feed feature, which allows feed to be adjusted; extra-fast feed creates a ruffled or “lettuce-leaf” effect. Finally, some merrowing machines contain parts to roll the fabric edge into the stitch for added durability.

Formation of an overlock stitch

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  1. When the needle enters the fabric, a loop is formed in the thread at the back of the needle.
  2. As the needle continues its downward motion into the fabric, the lower looper begins its movement from left to right. The tip of the lower looper passes behind the needle and through the loop of thread that has formed behind the needle.
  3. The lower looper continues along its path moving toward the right of the serger. As it moves, the lower thread is carried through the needle thread.
  4. While the lower looper is moving from left to right, the upper looper advances from right to left. The tip of the upper looper passes behind the lower looper and picks up the lower looper thread and needle thread.
  5. The lower looper now begins its move back into the far left position. As the upper looper continues to the left, it holds the lower looper thread and needle thread in place.
  6. The needle again begins its downward path passing behind the upper looper and securing the upper looper thread. This completes the overlock stitch formation and begins the stitch cycle all over again.

Uses of the overlock stitch

Overlock stitches are traditionally used for edging and light seaming. Other applications include: